Automatic Signing and Publishing of Android Apps from Travis

As I discussed about preparing the apps in Play Store for automatic deployment and Google App Signing in previous blogs, in this blog, I’ll talk about how to use Travis Ci to automatically sign and publish the apps using fastlane, as well as how to upload sensitive information like signing keys and publishing JSON to the Open Source repository. This method will be used to publish the following Android Apps:

Current Project Structure

The example project I have used to set up the process has the following structure:

It’s a normal Android Project with some .travis.yml and some additional bash scripts in scripts folder. The file is standard app build and repo push file found in FOSSASIA projects. The process used to develop it is documented in previous blogs. First, we’ll see how to upload our keys to the repo after encrypting them.

Encrypting keys using Travis

Travis provides a very nice documentation on encrypting files containing sensitive information, but a crucial information is buried below the page. As you’d normally want to upload two things to the repo – the app signing key, and API JSON file for release manager API of Google Play for Fastlane, you can’t do it separately by using standard file encryption command for travis as it will override the previous encrypted file’s secret. In order to do so, you need to create a tarball of all the files that need to be encrypted and encrypt that tar instead. Along with this, before you need to use the file, you’ll have to decrypt in in the travis build and also uncompress it for use.

So, first install Travis CLI tool and login using travis login (You should have right access to the repo and Travis CI in order to encrypt the files for it)

Then add the signing key and fastlane json in the scripts folder. Let’s assume the names of the files are key.jks and fastlane.json

Then, go to scripts folder and run this command to create a tar of these files:

tar cvf secrets.tar fastlane.json key.jks


secrets.tar will be created in the folder. Now, run this command to encrypt the file

travis encrypt-file secrets.tar


A new file secrets.tar.enc will be created in the folder. Now delete the original files and secrets tar so they do not get added to the repo by mistake. The output log will show the the command for decryption of the file to be added to the .travis.yml file.

Decrypting keys using Travis

But if we add it there, the keys will be decrypted for each commit on each branch. We want it to happen only for master branch as we only require publishing from that branch. So, we’ll create a bash script for the task with following content

set -e


if [ "$TRAVIS_PULL_REQUEST" != "false" -o "$TRAVIS_REPO_SLUG" != "iamareebjamal/android-test-fastlane" -o "$TRAVIS_BRANCH" != "$DEPLOY_BRANCH" ]; then
    echo "We decrypt key only for pushes to the master branch and not PRs. So, skip."
    exit 0

openssl aes-256-cbc -K $encrypted_4dd7_key -iv $encrypted_4dd7_iv -in ./scripts/secrets.tar.enc -out ./scripts/secrets.tar -d
tar xvf ./scripts/secrets.tar -C scripts/


Of course, you’ll have to change the commands and arguments according to your need and repo. Specially, the decryption command keys ID

The script checks if the repo and branch are correct, and the commit is not of a PR, then decrypts the file and extracts them in appropriate directory

Before signing the app, you’ll need to store the keystore password, alias and key password in Travis Environment Variables. Once you have done that, you can proceed to signing the app. I’ll assume the variable names to be $STORE_PASS, $ALIAS and $KEY_PASS respectively

Signing App

Now, come to the part in script where you have the unsigned release app built. Let’s assume its name is app-release-unsigned.apk.Then run this command to sign it

cp app-release-unsigned.apk app-release-unaligned.apk
jarsigner -verbose -tsa -sigalg SHA1withRSA -digestalg SHA1 -keystore ../scripts/key.jks -storepass $STORE_PASS -keypass $KEY_PASS app-release-unaligned.apk $ALIAS


Then run this command to zipalign the app

${ANDROID_HOME}/build-tools/25.0.2/zipalign -v -p 4 app-release-unaligned.apk app-release.apk


Remember that the build tools version should be the same as the one specified in .travis.yml

This will create an apk named app-release.apk

Publishing App

This is the easiest step. First install fastlane using this command

gem install fastlane


Then run this command to publish the app to alpha channel on Play Store

fastlane supply --apk app-release.apk --track alpha --json_key ../scripts/fastlane.json --package_name com.iamareebjamal.fastlane


You can always configure the arguments according to your need. Also notice that you have to provide the package name for Fastlane to know which app to update. This can also be stored as an environment variable.

This is all for this blog, you can read more about travis CLI, fastlane features and signing process in these links below:

Automatic Signing and Publishing of Android Apps from Travis

Enabling Google App Signing for Android Project

Signing key management of Android Apps is a hectic procedure and can grow out of hand rather quickly for large organizations with several independent projects. We, at FOSSASIA also had to face similar difficulties in management of individual keys by project maintainers and wanted to gather all these Android Projects under singular key management platform:

To handle the complexities and security aspect of the process, this year Google announced App Signing optional program where Google takes your existing key’s encrypted file and stores it on their servers and asks you to create a new upload key which will be used to sign further updates of the app. It takes the certificates of your new upload key and maps it to the managed private key. Now, whenever there is a new upload of the app, it’s signing certificate is matched with the upload key certificate and after verification, the app is signed by the original private key on the server itself and delivered to the user. The advantage comes where you lose your key, its password or it is compromised. Before App Signing program, if your key got lost, you had to launch your app under a new package name, losing your existing user base. With Google managing your key, if you lose your upload key, then the account owner can request Google to reassign a new upload key as the private key is secure on their servers.

There is no difference in the delivered app from the previous one as it is still finally signed by the original private key as it was before, except that Google also optimizes the app by splitting it into multiple APKs according to hardware, demographic and other factors, resulting in a much smaller app! This blog will take you through the steps in how to enable the program for existing and new apps. A bit of a warning though, for security reasons, opting in the program is permanent and once you do it, it is not possible to back out, so think it through before committing.

For existing apps:

First you need to go to the particular app’s detail section and then into Release Management > App Releases. There you would see the Get Started button for App Signing.

The account owner must first agree to its terms and conditions and once it’s done, a page like this will be presented with information about app signing infrastructure at top.

So, as per the instructions, download the PEPK jar file to encrypt your private key. For this process, you need to have your existing private key and its alias and password. It is fine if you don’t know the key password but store password is needed to generate the encrypted file. Then execute this command in the terminal as written in Step 2 of your Play console:

java -jar pepk.jar –keystore={{keystore_path}} –alias={{alias}} –output={{encrypted_file_output_path}} –encryptionkey=eb10fe8f7c7c9df715022017b00c6471f8ba8170b13049a11e6c09ffe3056a104a3bbe4ac5a955f4ba4fe93fc8cef27558a3eb9d2a529a2092761fb833b656cd48b9de6a

You will have to change the bold text inside curly braces to the correct keystore path, alias and the output file path you want respectively.

Note: The encryption key has been same for me for 3 different Play Store accounts, but might be different for you. So please confirm in Play console first

When you execute the command, it will ask you for the keystore password, and once you enter it, the encrypted file will be generated on the path you specified. You can upload it using the button on console.

After this, you’ll need to generate a new upload key. You can do this using several methods listed here, but for demonstration we’ll be using command line to do so:

keytool -genkey -v -keystore {{keystore_path}} -alias {{alias_name}} -keyalg RSA -keysize 2048 -validity 10000

The command will ask you a couple of questions related to the passwords and signing information and then the key will be generated. This will be your public key and be used for further signing of your apps. So keep it and the password secure and handy (even if it is expendable now).

After this step, you need to create a PEM upload certificate for this key, and in order to do so, execute this command:

keytool -export -rfc -keystore {{keystore_path}} -alias {{alias_name}} -file {{upload_certificate.pem}}

After this is executed, it’ll ask you the keystore password, and once you enter it, the PEM file will be generated and you will have to upload it to the Play console.

If everything goes right, your Play console will look something like this:


Click enrol and you’re done! Now you can go to App Signing section of the Release Management console and see your app signing and new upload key certificates


You can use the SHA1 hash to confirm the keys as to which one corresponds to private and upload if ever in confusion.

For new apps:

For new apps, the process is like a walk in park. You just need to enable the App Signing, and you’ll get an option to continue, opt-out or re-use existing key.


If you re-use existing key, the process is finished then and there and an existing key is deployed as the upload key for this app. But if you choose to Continue, then App Signing will be enabled and Google will use an arbitrary key as private key for the app and the first app you upload will get its key registered as the upload key


This is the screenshot of the App Signing console when there is no first app uploaded and you can see that it still has an app signing certificate of a key which you did not upload or have access to.

If you want to know more about app signing program, check out these links:

Enabling Google App Signing for Android Project

Automatic Imports of Events to Open Event from online event sites with Query Server and Event Collect

One goal for the next version of the Open Event project is to allow an automatic import of events from various event listing sites. We will implement this using Open Event Import APIs and two additional modules: Query Server and Event Collect. The idea is to run the modules as micro-services or as stand-alone solutions.

Query Server
The query server is, as the name suggests, a query processor. As we are moving towards an API-centric approach for the server, query-server also has API endpoints (v1). Using this API you can get the data from the server in the mentioned format. The API itself is quite intuitive.

API to get data from query-server

GET /api/v1/search/<search-engine>/query=query&format=format

Sample Response Header

 Cache-Control: no-cache
 Connection: keep-alive
 Content-Length: 1395
 Content-Type: application/xml; charset=utf-8
 Date: Wed, 24 May 2017 08:33:42 GMT
 Server: Werkzeug/0.12.1 Python/2.7.13
 Via: 1.1 vegur

The server is built in Flask. The GitHub repository of the server contains a simple Bootstrap front-end, which is used as a testing ground for results. The query string calls the search engine result scraper that is based on the scraper at searss. This scraper takes search engine, presently Google, Bing, DuckDuckGo and Yahoo as additional input and searches on that search engine. The output from the scraper, which can be in XML or in JSON depending on the API parameters is returned, while the search query is stored into MongoDB database with the query string indexing. This is done keeping in mind the capabilities to be added in order to use Kibana analyzing tools.

The frontend prettifies results with the help of PrismJS. The query-server will be used for initial listing of events from different search engines. This will be accessed through the following API.

The query server app can be accessed on heroku.

➢ api/list​: To provide with an initial list of events (titles and links) to be displayed on Open Event search results.

When an event is searched on Open Event, the query is passed on to query-server where a search is made by calling with appending some details for better event hunting. Recent developments with Google include their event search feature. In the Google search app, event searches take over when Google detects that a user is looking for an event.

The feed from the scraper is parsed for events inside query server to generate a list containing Event Titles and Links. Each event in this list is then searched for in the database to check if it exists already. We will be using elastic search to achieve fuzzy searching for events in Open Event database as elastic search is planned for the API to be used.

One example of what we wish to achieve by implementing this type of search in the database follows. The user may search for

-Google Cloud Event Delhi
-Google Event, Delhi
-Google Cloud, Delhi
-google cloud delhi
-Google Cloud Onboard Delhi
-Google Delhi Cloud event

All these searches should match with “Google Cloud Onboard Event, Delhi” with good accuracy. After removing duplicates and events which already exist in the database from this list have been deleted, each event is rendered on search frontend of Open Event as a separate event. The user can click on any of these event, which will make a call to event collect.

Event Collect

The event collect project is developed as a separate module which has two parts

● Site specific scrapers
In its present state, event collect has scrapers for eventbrite and ticket-leap which, given a query, scrape eventbrite (and ticket-leap respectively) search results and downloads JSON files of each event using Loklak‘s API.
The scrapers can be developed in any form or any number of scrapers/scraping tools can be added as long as they are in alignment with the Open Event Import API’s data format. Writing tests for these against the concurrent API formats will take care of this. This part will be covered by using a json-validator​ to check against a pre-generated schema.

The scrapers are exposed through a set of APIs, which will include, but not limited to,
➢ api/fetch-event : ​to scrape any event given the link and compose the data in a predefined JSON format which will be generated based on Open Event Import API. When this function is called on an event link, scrapers are invoked which collect event data such as event, meta, forms etc. This data will be validated against the generated JSON schema. The scraped JSON and directory structure for media files:
➢ api/export : to export all the JSON data containing event information into Open Event Server. As and when the scraping is complete, the data will be added into Open Event’s database as a new event.

How the Import works

The following graphic shows how the import works.

Let’s dive into the workflow. So as the diagram illustrates, the ‘search​’ functionality makes a call to api/list API endpoint provided by query-server which returns with events’ ‘Title’ and ‘Event Link’ from the parsed XML/JSON feed. This list is displayed as Open Event’s search results. Now the results having been displayed, the user can click on any of the events. When the user clicks on any event, the event is searched for in Open Event’s database. Two things happen now:

  • The event page loads if the event is found.
  • If the event does not already exist in the database, clicking on any event will

➢ Insert this event’s title and link in the database and get the event_id

➢ Make a call to api/fetch-event in event-collect which then invokes a site-specific scraper to fetch data about the event the user has chosen

➢ When the data is scraped, it is imported into Open Event database using the previously generated event_id. The page will be loaded using jquery ajax ​as and when the scraping is done.​When the imports are done, the search page refreshes with the new results. The Open Event Orga Server exposes a well documented REST API that can be used by external services to access the data.

Automatic Imports of Events to Open Event from online event sites with Query Server and Event Collect

Twitter Section Using loklak webtweets

In Open event web app, the user can provide URL of social links such as Twitter, Facebook etc in the event.json file inside the ZIP. The previous functionality was to use Twitter API and to generate a timeline showing the tweets of the twitter URL mentioned in event.json by user. But, it can be done by following another approach which reduces the third party dependency i.e Loklak-webtweets.

I have implemented the twitter section using loklak webtweets which can be done very easily.

Step 1:  Including necessary files from loklakwebtweets repository inside index.html. You can find them in js/ folder of this repository.

<script src="./dependencies/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="./dependencies/bootstrap.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="./dependencies/loklak-fetcher.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
 <script src="./dependencies/tweets.js" type="text/javascript"></script>


Step 2:  Specify the data source in HTML from which twitter data will be fetched. Here I have extracted the last word from the twitter URL provided by the user and passed it to HTML.

const sociallinks = Array.from(event.social_links);
 var twitter ="";
 sociallinks.forEach((link) => {
  if( === "twitter") {
   twitter =;
 const arrayTwitterLink = sociallink.split('/');
 const twitterLink = arrayTwitterLink[arrayTwitterLink.length - 1];
 const urls= {
   twitterLink: twitterLink,
   tweetUrl: twitter,

This code will search twitter link in social links array present in event.json and get its last character which will be provided to data-from and data-query attribute of HTML.

 <section class="sponsorscont">
  <div class="tweet-row">
   <div class="col-sm-12 col-md-12 col-xs-12">
    <i class ="social_twitter fa fa-twitter"></i>
     <div class="tweets-feed" id="tweets" data-count=50 data-query="    {{{eventurls.twitterLink}}}" data-from="{{{eventurls.twitterLink}}}">
     <div class="arrow-up"></div>
      <p id="tweet" class="tweet">
   <span style="margin-bottom: 20px;" id="dateTweeted"></span>
    <b><a href="{{eventurls.tweetUrl}}"/>
    </b></u> for more updates</p> 

Step 3 : Now we just need to add styling so that it looks decent. For that, I have written some SASS.

.tweets-feed {
   color: $black;
   line-height: 30px;
   font-size: 20px;
   transition: opacity 0.2s linear;
   margin-bottom: 20px;
   height: 100px;
  a {
   color: $black;
   text-decoration: underline;
   font-weight: 700;

  #dateTweeted {
   font-size: 15px;
   display: block;


.tweet-row {
   padding: 0 80px;
   margin-bottom: 80px;
   .social_twitter {
     font-size: 60px;
     margin-bottom: 12px;

The output from the above code is a well designed Twitter section fetching tweets from the URL provided as a string in event.json by user.



Twitter Section Using loklak webtweets

Spin-Off: Loklak fuels Open Event

Continuing with the Loklak & Open Event Partnership (check out Loklak fuels Open Event ), we can now easily in clicks create our very own web-app for the event with details imported from powered by Loklak.

The scraping of data done using JSoup, Java HTML parsing was explained in the previous post of this series.

Next, a console service was implemented as the single point for information retrieval from various social networks and websites (a post coming for it soon 😉 ) especially for SUSI (our very own personal digital assistant, a cute one indeed !)

The JSONArray result of the EventBriteCrawler was set in SusiThought, which is nothing but a piece of data that can be remembered. The structure or the thought can be modelled as a table which may be created using the retrieval of information from elsewhere of the current argument.

/** Defining SusiThought as a class 
 * which extends JSONObject

public class SusiThought extends JSONObject {

/* details coming soon.... */


/** Modifications in EventBriteCrawler
 *  Returning SusiThought instead of 
 * a simple JSONObject/JSONArray.
public static SusiThought crawlEventBrite(String url) {
    SusiThought json = new SusiThought();
    return json;


The API EndPoint was thus created.
A sample is as: * FROM eventbrite WHERE url=’′;

Screenshot from 2016-07-15 13:22:00


The files generated were next imported in the Open Event Web App generator, using simple steps.


Screenshot from 2016-07-15 13:25:39 Screenshot from 2016-07-15 13:36:19

It’s amazing to see how a great visual platform is provided to edit details parsed from the plain JSONObject and deploy the personalized web-app !

Screenshot from 2016-07-15 13:59:47

Screenshot from 2016-07-15 12:55:06Screenshot from 2016-07-15 12:55:18Screenshot from 2016-07-15 12:55:29Screenshot from 2016-07-15 12:54:24
Screenshot from 2016-07-15 12:54:33
Tadaa !
We have our very own event web-app with all the information imported from in a single (well, very few 😛 ) click (s) !

With this, we conclude the Loklak – Open Event – EventBrite series.

Stay tuned for detailed post on SUSI and Console Services 🙂

Spin-Off: Loklak fuels Open Event

Loklak fuels Open Event

A general background building….

The FOSSASIA Open Event Project aims to make it easier for events, conferences, tech summits to easily create Web and Mobile (only Android currently) micro Apps. The project comprises of a data schema for easily storing event details, a server and web front-end that are used to view, modify, update this data easily by the event organizers, a mobile-friendly web-app client to show the event data to attendees, an Android app template which will be used to generate specific apps for each event.

And Eventbrite is the world’s largest self-service ticketing platform. It allows anyone to create, share and find events comprising music festivals, marathons, conferences, hackathons, air guitar contests, political rallies, fundraisers, gaming competitions etc.

Kaboom !

Loklak now has a dedicated Eventbrite scraper API which takes in the URL of the event listing on and outputs JSON Files as required by the Open Event Generator viz: events.json, organizer.json, user.json, microlocations.json, sessions.json, session_types.json, tracks.json, sponsors.json, speakers.json, social _links.json and custom_forms.json (details: Open Event Server : API Documentation)

What do we differently do than using the Eventbrite API  ? No authentication tokens required. This gels in perfectly with the Loklak missive.

To achieve this, I have simply parsed the HTML Pages using my favorite JSoup: The Java HTML parser library because it provides a very convenient API for extracting and manipulating data, scrape and parse all varieties of HTML from a URL.

The API call format is as:[event-name-and-id]

And in return we get all the details on the Eventbrite page as JSONObject and also it gets stored in differently named files in a zipped folder [userHome + “/Downloads/EventBriteInfo”]


Event URL:
Screenshot from 2016-07-04 07:04:38

API Call:

Output: JSON Object on screen andevents.json, organizer.json, user.json, microlocations.json, sessions.json, session_types.json, tracks.json, sponsors.json, speakers.json, social _links.json and custom_forms.json files written out in a zipped folder locally.

Screenshot from 2016-07-04 07:05:16
Screenshot from 2016-07-04 07:57:00

For reference, the code is as:

 * Crawler v2.0
 *  Copyright 19.06.2016 by Jigyasa Grover, @jig08
 *  This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
 *  modify it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public
 *  License as published by the Free Software Foundation; either
 *  version 2.1 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.
 *  This library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
 *  but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
 *  Lesser General Public License for more details.
 *  You should have received a copy of the GNU Lesser General Public License
 *  along with this program in the file lgpl21.txt
 *  If not, see



import javax.servlet.ServletException;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServlet;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletRequest;
import javax.servlet.http.HttpServletResponse;

import org.json.JSONArray;
import org.json.JSONObject;
import org.jsoup.Jsoup;
import org.jsoup.nodes.Document;
import org.jsoup.nodes.Element;
import org.loklak.http.RemoteAccess;
import org.loklak.server.Query;

public class EventbriteCrawler extends HttpServlet {

	private static final long serialVersionUID = 5216519528576842483L;

	protected void doPost(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
			throws ServletException, IOException {
		doGet(request, response);

	protected void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response)
			throws ServletException, IOException {
		Query post = RemoteAccess.evaluate(request);

		// manage DoS
		if (post.isDoS_blackout()) {
			response.sendError(503, "your request frequency is too high");

		String url = post.get("url", "");

		Document htmlPage = null;

		try {
			htmlPage = Jsoup.connect(url).get();
		} catch (Exception e) {

		String eventID = null;
		String eventName = null;
		String eventDescription = null;

		// TODO Fetch Event Color
		String eventColor = null;

		String imageLink = null;

		String eventLocation = null;

		String startingTime = null;
		String endingTime = null;

		String ticketURL = null;

		Elements tagSection = null;
		Elements tagSpan = null;
		String[][] tags = new String[5][2];
		String topic = null; // By default

		String closingDateTime = null;
		String schedulePublishedOn = null;
		JSONObject creator = new JSONObject();
		String email = null;

		Float latitude = null;
		Float longitude = null;

		String privacy = "public"; // By Default
		String state = "completed"; // By Default
		String eventType = "";

		eventID = htmlPage.getElementsByTag("body").attr("data-event-id");
		eventName = htmlPage.getElementsByClass("listing-hero-body").text();
		eventDescription ="").text();

		eventColor = null;

		imageLink = htmlPage.getElementsByTag("picture").attr("content");

		eventLocation ="p.listing-map-card-street-address.text-default").text();
		startingTime = htmlPage.getElementsByAttributeValue("property", "event:start_time").attr("content").substring(0,
		endingTime = htmlPage.getElementsByAttributeValue("property", "event:end_time").attr("content").substring(0,

		ticketURL = url + "#tickets";

		// TODO Tags to be modified to fit in the format of Open Event "topic"
		tagSection = htmlPage.getElementsByAttributeValue("data-automation", "ListingsBreadcrumbs");
		tagSpan ="span");
		topic = "";

		int iterator = 0, k = 0;
		for (Element e : tagSpan) {
			if (iterator % 2 == 0) {
				tags[k][1] = ""
			} else {
				tags[k][0] = e.text();

		creator.put("email", "");
		creator.put("id", "1"); // By Default

		latitude = Float
				.valueOf(htmlPage.getElementsByAttributeValue("property", "event:location:latitude").attr("content"));
		longitude = Float
				.valueOf(htmlPage.getElementsByAttributeValue("property", "event:location:longitude").attr("content"));

		// TODO This returns: "events.event" which is not supported by Open
		// Event Generator
		// eventType = htmlPage.getElementsByAttributeValue("property",
		// "og:type").attr("content");

		String organizerName = null;
		String organizerLink = null;
		String organizerProfileLink = null;
		String organizerWebsite = null;
		String organizerContactInfo = null;
		String organizerDescription = null;
		String organizerFacebookFeedLink = null;
		String organizerTwitterFeedLink = null;
		String organizerFacebookAccountLink = null;
		String organizerTwitterAccountLink = null;

		organizerName ="a.js-d-scroll-to.listing-organizer-name.text-default").text().substring(4);
		organizerLink = url + "#listing-organizer";
		organizerProfileLink = htmlPage
				.getElementsByAttributeValue("class", "js-follow js-follow-target follow-me fx--fade-in is-hidden")
		organizerContactInfo = url + "#lightbox_contact";

		Document orgProfilePage = null;

		try {
			orgProfilePage = Jsoup.connect(organizerProfileLink).get();
		} catch (Exception e) {

		organizerWebsite = orgProfilePage.getElementsByAttributeValue("class", "l-pad-vert-1 organizer-website").text();
		organizerDescription ="div.js-long-text.organizer-description").text();
		organizerFacebookFeedLink = organizerProfileLink + "#facebook_feed";
		organizerTwitterFeedLink = organizerProfileLink + "#twitter_feed";
		organizerFacebookAccountLink = orgProfilePage.getElementsByAttributeValue("class", "fb-page").attr("data-href");
		organizerTwitterAccountLink = orgProfilePage.getElementsByAttributeValue("class", "twitter-timeline")

		JSONArray socialLinks = new JSONArray();

		JSONObject fb = new JSONObject();
		fb.put("id", "1");
		fb.put("name", "Facebook");
		fb.put("link", organizerFacebookAccountLink);

		JSONObject tw = new JSONObject();
		tw.put("id", "2");
		tw.put("name", "Twitter");
		tw.put("link", organizerTwitterAccountLink);

		JSONArray jsonArray = new JSONArray();

		JSONObject event = new JSONObject();
		event.put("event_url", url);
		event.put("id", eventID);
		event.put("name", eventName);
		event.put("description", eventDescription);
		event.put("color", eventColor);
		event.put("background_url", imageLink);
		event.put("closing_datetime", closingDateTime);
		event.put("creator", creator);
		event.put("email", email);
		event.put("location_name", eventLocation);
		event.put("latitude", latitude);
		event.put("longitude", longitude);
		event.put("start_time", startingTime);
		event.put("end_time", endingTime);
		event.put("logo", imageLink);
		event.put("organizer_description", organizerDescription);
		event.put("organizer_name", organizerName);
		event.put("privacy", privacy);
		event.put("schedule_published_on", schedulePublishedOn);
		event.put("state", state);
		event.put("type", eventType);
		event.put("ticket_url", ticketURL);
		event.put("social_links", socialLinks);
		event.put("topic", topic);

		JSONObject org = new JSONObject();
		org.put("organizer_name", organizerName);
		org.put("organizer_link", organizerLink);
		org.put("organizer_profile_link", organizerProfileLink);
		org.put("organizer_website", organizerWebsite);
		org.put("organizer_contact_info", organizerContactInfo);
		org.put("organizer_description", organizerDescription);
		org.put("organizer_facebook_feed_link", organizerFacebookFeedLink);
		org.put("organizer_twitter_feed_link", organizerTwitterFeedLink);
		org.put("organizer_facebook_account_link", organizerFacebookAccountLink);
		org.put("organizer_twitter_account_link", organizerTwitterAccountLink);

		JSONArray microlocations = new JSONArray();

		JSONArray customForms = new JSONArray();

		JSONArray sessionTypes = new JSONArray();

		JSONArray sessions = new JSONArray();

		JSONArray sponsors = new JSONArray();

		JSONArray speakers = new JSONArray();

		JSONArray tracks = new JSONArray();

		JSONObject eventBriteResult = new JSONObject();
		eventBriteResult.put("Event Brite Event Details", jsonArray);

		// print JSON
		PrintWriter sos = response.getWriter();

		String userHome = System.getProperty("user.home");
		String path = userHome + "/Downloads/EventBriteInfo";

		new File(path).mkdir();

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/event.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/org.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/social_links.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/microlocations.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/custom_forms.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/session_types.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/sessions.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/sponsors.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/speakers.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try (FileWriter file = new FileWriter(path + "/tracks.json")) {
		} catch (IOException e1) {

		try {
			zipFolder(path, userHome + "/Downloads");
		} catch (Exception e1) {


	static public void zipFolder(String srcFolder, String destZipFile) throws Exception {
		ZipOutputStream zip = null;
		FileOutputStream fileWriter = null;
		fileWriter = new FileOutputStream(destZipFile);
		zip = new ZipOutputStream(fileWriter);
		addFolderToZip("", srcFolder, zip);

	static private void addFileToZip(String path, String srcFile, ZipOutputStream zip) throws Exception {
		File folder = new File(srcFile);
		if (folder.isDirectory()) {
			addFolderToZip(path, srcFile, zip);
		} else {
			byte[] buf = new byte[1024];
			int len;
			FileInputStream in = new FileInputStream(srcFile);
			zip.putNextEntry(new ZipEntry(path + "/" + folder.getName()));
			while ((len = > 0) {
				zip.write(buf, 0, len);

	static private void addFolderToZip(String path, String srcFolder, ZipOutputStream zip) throws Exception {
		File folder = new File(srcFolder);

		for (String fileName : folder.list()) {
			if (path.equals("")) {
				addFileToZip(folder.getName(), srcFolder + "/" + fileName, zip);
			} else {
				addFileToZip(path + "/" + folder.getName(), srcFolder + "/" + fileName, zip);


Check out for more…


Feel free to ask questions regarding the above code snippet.

Also, Stay tuned for the next part of this post which shall include using the scraped information for Open Event.

Feedback and Suggestions welcome 🙂

Loklak fuels Open Event