Updating the UI of the generator form in Open Event Webapp

  • Add a pop-up menu bar similar to the one shown in Google/Susper6be8d972-72bc-4e12-b27a-219e46608cfc.png
  • Add a version deployment link at the bottom of the page like the one shown in staging.loklak.org.

29072668-b1db-4ef5-8865-c71ef2438433.png

 

  • Implementing the top-bar and the pop-up menu bar

The first task was to introduce a top-bar and a pop-up menu bar in Generator. The top-bar would contain the text Open Event Webapp Generator and an icon button on the right side of it which would show a pop-up menu. The pop-up menu would contain a number of icons which would link to different pages like FOSSASIA blogs and it’s official website, different projects like loklak, SUSI and Eventyay and also to the Webapp Project Readme and issues page.

Creating a top navbar is easy but the pop-up menu is a comparatively tougher. The first step was to gather the gather the small images of the different services. Since this feature had already been implemented in Susper project, we just copied all the icon images from there and copy it into a folder named icons in the open event webapp. Then we create a custom menu div which would hold all the different icons and present it an aesthetic manner. Write the HTML code for the menu and then CSS to decorate and position it! Also, we have to create a click event handler on the pop-up menu button for toggling the menu on and off.

Here is an excerpt of the code. The whole file can be seen here

<div class="custom-navbar">
 <a href='.' class="custom-navtitle">
   <strong>Open Event Webapp Generator</strong> <!-- Navbar Title -->
 </a>
 <div class="custom-menubutton">
   <i class="glyphicon glyphicon-th"></i> <!-- Pop-up Menu button -->
 </div>
 <div class="custom-menu"> <!-- Custom pop-up menu containing different links -->
   <div class="custom-menu-item">
     <a class="custom-icon" href="http://github.com/fossasia/open-event-webapp" target="_blank"><img src="./icons/code.png">
       <p class="custom-title">Code</p></a>
   </div>
   <!-- Code for other links to different projects-->
 </div>
</div>

Here is a screenshot of how the top-bar and the pop-up menu looks!

bb82ba88-4317-46b0-91ec-514499c5cfde.png

  • Adding version deployment info to the bottom

The next task was to add a footer to the page which would contain the version deployment info. The user can click on that link and we can then be taken to the latest version of the code which is currently deployed.

To show the version info, we make use of the Github API. We need to get the hash of the latest commit made on the development branch. We send an API request to the Github requesting for the latest hash and then dynamically add the info and the link received to the footer. The user can then click on that link and will be taken to the latest deployment page of the webapp!

var apiUrl = "https://api.github.com/repos/fossasia/open-event-webapp/git/refs/heads/development";
$.ajax({url: apiUrl, success: function(result){
 var version = result['object']['sha'];
 var versionLink = 'https://github.com/fossasia/open-event-webapp/tree/' + version;
 var deployLink = $('#deploy-link');
 deployLink.attr('href', versionLink);
 deployLink.html(version);
}});

This is how the footer looks after the API Response

44385ad8-e094-490b-8575-a47932aa75c5.png

References:

Updating the UI of the generator form in Open Event Webapp

Know the Usage of all Emoji’s on Twitter with loklak Emoji Heatmap

Loklak apps page now has a new app in its store, Emoji Heatmap. This app can be used to see the usage of all the emoji’s in the tweets all over the world in the form of heatmap. So, the major difference between the emoji heatmap and emoji heatmapper apps are heatmapper shows the tweets related to specific search query whereas this heatmapper app, it displays all the tweets which contains emojis.

How do the App fetches and stores the locations

The emoji heatmap uses the loklak search API . The search API needs a query in order to search and output the JSON data. But this app takes no input from the user end to search any query. To make the search dynamic, we are using an existing JSON file from emojiHeatmapper app and loklak-fetcher-client javascript file. From the emoji.json file, we collect the each query item and search it using loklak-fetcher-client. The output json file which we get from loklak-fetcher-client is retrieved into the emojiHeatmap and we extract the location parameter. The location parameter is then stored into the “feature” option of open layers 3 maps.

So, here in the emoji Heatmap app, we iterate over the emoji.json, get different search query each time when we search for it using loklak search API.

Code which adds the location retrieved into feature

  $.getJSON("../emojiHeatmapper/emoji.json", function(json) {
    for (var i = 0; i < json.data.length; i++){
      var query = json.data[i][1];
      // Fetch loklak API data, and fill the vector
      loklakFetcher.getTweets(query, function(tweets) {
        for(var i = 0; i < tweets.statuses.length; i++) {
          if(tweets.statuses[i].location_point !== undefined){
          // Creation of the point with the tweet's coordinates
          //  Coords system swap is required: OpenLayers uses by default
          //  EPSG:3857, while loklak's output is EPSG:4326
            var point = new ol.geom.Point(ol.proj.transform(tweets.statuses[i].location_point, 'EPSG:4326', 'EPSG:3857'));
            vector.addFeature(new ol.Feature({  // Add the point to the data vector
              geometry: point,
              weight: 20
            }));
          }
        }
      });
    }
  });

 

The above function gets has two variables query and point. The query variable stores the data that is being retrieved from the emoji.json file each time it iterates and that query is being sent into the loklak-fetcher-client. Then the point variable is in which the location tracked using the loklak search API is converted into the co-ordinates system followed by the Open Layers 3. Then the point is added as a feature to the map vector. The map vector is the place where all the features are stored and then appended onto the map as a heatmap.

Resources

Know the Usage of all Emoji’s on Twitter with loklak Emoji Heatmap

Adding React based World Mood Tracker to loklak Apps

loklak apps is a website that hosts various apps that are built by using loklak API. It uses static pages and angular.js to make API calls and show results from users. As a part of my GSoC project, I had to introduce the World Mood Tracker app using loklak’s mood API. But since I had planned to work on React, I had to go off from the track of typical app development in loklak apps and integrate a React app in apps.loklak.org.

In this blog post, I will be discussing how I introduced a React based app to apps.loklak.org and solved the problem of country-wise visualisation of mood related data on a World map.

Setting up development environment inside apps.loklak.org

After following the steps to create a new app in apps.loklak.org, I needed to add proper tools and libraries for smooth development of the World Mood Tracker app. In this section, I’ll be explaining the basic configuration that made it possible for a React app to be functional in the angular environment.

Pre-requisites

The most obvious prerequisite for the project was Node.js. I used node v8.0.0 while development of the app. Instead of npm, I decided to go with yarn because of offline caching and Internet speed issues in India.

Webpack and Babel

To begin with, I initiated yarn in the app directory inside project and added basic dependencies –

$ yarn init
$ yarn add webpack webpack-dev-server path
$ yarn add babel-loader babel-core babel-preset-es2015 babel-preset-react --dev

 

Next, I configured webpack to set an entry point and output path for the node project in webpack.config.js

module.exports = {
    entry: './js/index.js',
    output: {
        path: path.resolve('.'),
        filename: 'index_bundle.js'
    },
    ...
};

This would signal to look for ./js/index.js as an entry point while bundling. Similarly, I configured babel for es2015 and React presets –

{
  "presets":[
    "es2015", "react"
  ]
}

 

After this, I was in a state to define loaders for module in webpack.config.js. The loaders would check for /\.js$/ and /\.jsx$/ and assign them to babel-loader (with an exclusion of node_modules).

React

After configuring the basic presets and loaders, I added React to dependencies of the project –

$ yarn add react react-dom

 

The React related files needed to be in ./js/ directory so that the webpack can bundle it. I used the file to create a simple React app –

import React from 'react';
import ReactDOM from 'react-dom';

ReactDOM.render(
    <div>World Mood Tracker</div>,
    document.getElementById('app')
);

 

After this, I was in a stage where it was possible to use this app as a part of apps.loklak.org app. But to do this, I first needed to compile these files and bundle them so that the external app can use it.

Configuring the build target for webpack

In apps.loklak.org, we need to have a file by the name of index.html in the app’s root directory. Here, we also needed to place the bundled js properly so it could be included in index.html at app’s root.

HTML Webpack Plugin

Using html-webpack-plugin, I enabled auto building of project in the app’s root directory by using the following configuration in webpack.config.js

...
const HtmlWebpackPlugin = require('html-webpack-plugin');
const HtmlWebpackPluginConfig = new HtmlWebpackPlugin({
    template: './js/index.html',
    filename: 'index.html',
    inject: 'body'
});
module.exports = {
    ...
    plugins: [HtmlWebpackPluginConfig]
};

 

This would build index.html at app’s root that would be discoverable externally.

To enable bundling of the project using simple yarn build command, the following lines were added to package.json

{
  ..
  "scripts": {
    ..
    "build": "webpack -p"
  }
}

After a simple yarn build command, we can see the bundled js and html being created at the app root.

Using datamaps for visualization

Datamaps is a JS library which allows plotting of data on map using D3 as backend. It provides a simple interface for creating visualizations and comes with a handy npm installation –

$ yarn add datamaps

Map declaration and usage as state

A map from datamaps was used a state for React component which allowed fast rendering of changes in the map as the state of React component changes –

export default class WorldMap extends React.Component {
    constructor() {
        super();
        this.state = {
            map: null
        };
    render() {
        return (<div className={styles.container}>
                <div id="map-container"></div></div>)
    }
    componentDidMount() {
        this.setState({map: new Datamap({...})});
    }
    ...
}

 

The declaration of map goes in componentDidMount method because it would not be possible to start the map until we have the div with id=”map-container” in the DOM. It was necessary to draw the map only after the component has mounted otherwise it would fail due to no id=”map-container” in the DOM.

Defining data for countries

Data for every country had two components –

data = {
    positiveScore: someValue,
    negativeScore: someValue
}

 

This data is used to generate popup for the counties –

this.setState({
    map: new Datamap({
        ...
        geographyConfig: {
            ...
            popupTemplate: function (geo, data) {
                // Configure variables pScore so that it gives “No Data” when data.positiveScore is not set (similar for negative)
                return [
                    // Use pScore and nScore to generate results here
                    // geo.properties.name would give current country name
                ].join('');
            }
        }
    })
});

The result for countries with unknown data values look something like this –

Conclusion

In this blog post, I explained about introducing a React based app in app.loklak.org’s angular based environment. I discussed the setup and bundling process of the project so it becomes available from the project’s external HTTP server.

I also discussed using datamaps as a visualisation tool for data about Tweets. The app was first introduced in pull request fossasia/apps.loklak.org#189 and was improved step by step in subsequent patches.

Resources

Adding React based World Mood Tracker to loklak Apps

How the Compare Twitter Profiles loklak App works

People usually have a tendency to compare their profiles with others, So this is what exactly this app is used for: To compare Twitter profiles. loklak provides so many API’s which serves different functionalities. One among those API’s which I am using to implement this app is loklak’s User Details API. This API actually help in getting all the details of the user we search giving the user name as the query. In this app am going to implement a comparison between two twitter profiles which is shown in the form of tables on the output screen.

Usage of loklak’s User Profile API in the app:

In this app when the user given in the user names in the search fields as seen below:

The queries entered into the search field are taken and used as query in the User Profile API. The query in the code is taken in the following form:

var userQueryCommand = 'http://api.loklak.org/api/user.json?' +
                       'callback=JSON_CALLBACK&screen_name=' +
                       $scope.query;

var userQueryCommand1 = 'http://api.loklak.org/api/user.json?' +
                        'callback=JSON_CALLBACK&screen_name=' +
                        $scope.query1;

The query return a json output from which we fetch details which we need. A simple query and its json output:

http://api.loklak.org/api/user.json?screen_name=fossasia

Sample json output:

{
  "search_metadata": {"client": "162.158.50.42"},
  "user": {
    "$P": "I",
    "utc_offset": -25200,
    "friends_count": 282,
    "profile_image_url_https": "https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1141238022/fossasia-cubelogo_normal.jpg",
    "listed_count": 185,
    "profile_background_image_url": "http://pbs.twimg.com/profile_background_images/882420659/14d1d447527f8524c6aa0c568fb421d8.jpeg",
    "default_profile_image": false,
    "favourites_count": 1877,
    "description": "#FOSSASIA #OpenTechSummit 2017, March 17-19 in Singapore https://t.co/aKhIo2s1Ck #OpenTech community of developers & creators #Code #Hardware #OpenDesign",
    "created_at": "Sun Jun 20 16:13:15 +0000 2010",
    "is_translator": false,
    "profile_background_image_url_https": "https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_background_images/882420659/14d1d447527f8524c6aa0c568fb421d8.jpeg",
    "protected": false,
    "screen_name": "fossasia",
    "id_str": "157702526",
    "profile_link_color": "DD2E44",
    "is_translation_enabled": false,
    "translator_type": "none",
    "id": 157702526,
    "geo_enabled": true,
    "profile_background_color": "F50000",
    "lang": "en",
    "has_extended_profile": false,
    "profile_sidebar_border_color": "000000",
    "profile_location": null,
    "profile_text_color": "333333",
    "verified": false,
    "profile_image_url": "http://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/1141238022/fossasia-cubelogo_normal.jpg",
    "time_zone": "Pacific Time (US & Canada)",
    "url": "http://t.co/eLxWZtqTHh",
    "contributors_enabled": false,
    "profile_background_tile": true,
}

 

I am getting data from the json outputs as shown above, I use different fields from the json output like screen_name, favourites_count etc.

Injecting data from loklak API response using Angular:

As the loklak’s user profile API returns a json format file, I am using Angular JS to align the data according to the needs in the app.

I am using JSONP to retrieve the data from the API. JSONP or “JSON with padding” is a JSON extension wherein a prefix is specified as an input argument of the call itself. This how it is written in code:

$http.jsonp(String(userQueryCommand)).success(function (response) {
    $scope.userData = response.user;
 });

Here the response is stored into a $scope is an application object here. Using the $scope.userData variable , we access the data and display it on the screen using Javascript, HTML and CSS.

<div id="contactCard" style="pull-right">
    <div class="panel panel-default">
        <div class="panel-heading clearfix">
            <h3 class="panel-title pull-left">User 1 Profile</h3>
        </div>
        <div class="list-group">
            <div class="list-group-item">
                <img src="{{userData.profile_image_url}}" alt="" style="pull-left">
                <h4 class="list-group-item-heading" >{{userData.name}}</h4>
            </div>

In this app am also adding keyboard action and validations of fields which will not allow users to search for an empty query using this simple line in the input field.

ng-keyup="$event.keyCode == 13 && query1 != '' && query != '' ? Search() : null"

 


Resources:

How the Compare Twitter Profiles loklak App works